I was trying to find the most efficient way of giving students the knowledge and skils that I had, I was treating them as interchangeable receptacles.
Bill Ayers, Professor, University of Illinois

ICT2

Consider the often-heard lament, “some students are just not cut out for school.” The statement -Michael Wesch

Wed, 04/23/2008 - 18:11 -- admin
Consider the often-heard lament, “some students are just not cut out for school.” The statement passes without question or even a hint of protest, yet think about what the statement says when we replace “school” with what school should be all about: “learning.” Some students are just not cut out for learning?

Secondary [should be] the final shift over to project-based learning and allow much more freedom to -Paul Hillsdon

Thu, 03/13/2008 - 16:31 -- admin
Secondary [should be] the final shift over to project-based learning and allow much more freedom to students on their choice of topics..[students] will learn whom to go to for certain problems...will not be in classrooms much at all anymore ... will have to organize their time properly and meet with peers and facilitators when necessary. Once completed, if done throughly enough, the student will progress to graduation. Using their skills, portfolio and connections, they will then be able to sell themselves and their capabilities to employers or organizations, or advance to university.

All the power is in the hands of the student; where it has always been. While it may be against the -Paul Hillsdon

Thu, 03/13/2008 - 16:02 -- admin
All the power is in the hands of the student; where it has always been. While it may be against the law is not be in school under the age of 16, it's definitely within the control of the student whether he or she wishes to actually learn something.

School Design for Small Learning Communities

Thu, 03/13/2008 - 14:48 -- admin

Jeff Lackney of School Design Studio facilitated a month long series of design workshops with students and teachers from West High School in Madison, Wisconsin aimed at creating smaller learning communities within the large 2,000 student school. This process was one of many activities involved in a planning grant awarded the school in 2003 by the U.S. Department of Education.

What we need most to improve the quality of our le-a group of teenagers in the UK, as quoted by John Abbott

Mon, 02/18/2008 - 17:06 -- admin
What we need most to improve the quality of our learning is more contact with adults other than parents and teachers. We know what our parents think, because we’ve heard it every day for years. We’re slightly suspicious of what teachers say because they’re actually paid to say that. What we want to know is what do other adults think… and we don’t meet very many of those.

Imagine a School: Students Describe What Schools Would Look Like If We Got It Right

Imagine a School was a dramatic performance created by high school students from Halifax, Toronto and Vancouver that opened CEA’s symposium “Getting it Right for Adolescent Learners” in 2006. Find out what adolescents are saying about their experiences in high schools and what schools would look like if we “got it right”.

Read more about/order the DVD of this student performance, or read an article by Kathy Gould Lundy exploring the creative process of the actors and teachers involved in the project

Elementary Students Design Own Classroom

When a dozen or so educators from Indianapolis traveled to Reggio Emilia, Italy, several years ago to study the famous constructivist approach in that city’s preschools, they came back prepared for more than project-based teaching — they came ready to decorate. Last fall, the group offered elementary school teachers a classroom makeover in the Reggio Emilia style, and Sharon Olson, a teacher at Winding Ridge Elementary School, immediately volunteered. Their decor strategy was based on the idea that to take ownership of their learning, children must own their learning space.

The Unprocessed Child: Living Without School

Thu, 01/31/2008 - 18:51 -- admin

Laurie Chancey spent her childhood immersing herself in topics of her own choosing. She was never forced to learn something simply because tradition and/or society said it was necessary. No one was looking over her shoulder to make sure she was learning the “proper” subjects.

She enrolled in college when she was eighteen, and graduated summa cum laude three and a half years later. Laurie is a bright adult, but her IQ is not why she did so well. She spent her life learning to learn and it’s something that now comes easily to her.

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